Oregano Essential Oil for Goats

If you told me I could pick just one remedy for my goats, I wouldn’t even hesitate before I grabbed the bottle of oregano essential oil. This page will detail the research and, as time permits, the uses of oregano essential oil for goats. Simply tap on the topic you’re interested in to see the research summary and link to the study.

Bactericidal Property of Oregano Oil Against Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolates

Development of non-antibiotic alternatives to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) microbes represents one of the top priorities in healthcare and community settings, especially in the care of combat trauma-associated wound infections. Here, we investigate efficacy of oregano oil against pathogenic bacteria including MDR isolates from the combat casualties in vitro and in a mouse burn model. Oregano oil showed a significant anti-bacterial activity against 11 MDR clinical isolates including four Acinetobacter baumannii, three Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and four methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) obtained from combat casualties and two luminescent strains of PA01 and MRSA USA300, with a MIC ranging from 0.08 mg/ml to 0.64 mg/ml. Oregano oil also effectively eradicated biofilms formed by each of the 13 pathogens above at similar MICs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that oregano oil damaged bacterial cells and altered the morphology of their biofilms. While efficiently inactivating bacteria, there was no evidence of resistance development after up to 20 consecutive passages of representative bacterial strains in the presence of sublethal doses of oregano oil. In vivo study using the third-degree burn wounds infected with PA01 or USA300 demonstrated that oregano oil, topically applied 24 h after bacterial inoculation, sufficiently reduced the bacterial load in the wounds by 3 log10 in 1 h, as measured by drastic reduction of bacterial bioluminescence. This bactericidal activity of oregano oil concurred with no significant side effect on the skin histologically or genotoxicity after three topical applications of oregano oil at 10 mg/ml for three consecutive days. The investigation suggests potentials of oregano oil as an alternative to antibiotics for the treatment of wound-associated infections regardless of antibiotic susceptibility.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6182053

Oregano essential oil improves piglet health and performance through maternal feeding and is associated with changes in the gut microbiota

Abstract

Background

With a growing demand for safe and sustainable alternatives to antimicrobials, functional feed ingredients such as plant essential oils have been evaluated for their potential to improve gut health. Amongst these, oregano essential oil (OEO) with the main active compounds carvacrol and thymol has been reported to have antimicrobial and antioxidative properties resulting in improved intestinal barrier function and growth in pigs and poultry. However, its impact on the gut microbiota still remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of an oregano essential oil phytobiotic on sow and piglet performance and faecal microbiota.

Results

Piglets from OEO supplemented sows were significantly heavier at one week of age and showed a trend for improved average daily weight gain from birth to weaning. Post-weaning, maternally supplemented piglets were numerically heavier at 10 weeks post-weaning and at slaughter with a reduced variability in bodyweight. Health records showed that piglets in the OEO supplemented litters had significantly reduced incidence of therapeutic treatment and reduced mortality. In both sows and piglets, the structure and composition of the faecal microbiota varied considerably over time. Sows supplemented with OEO during lactation showed an increase in the relative abundance of Lactobacillaceae family. In addition, there was an increase in the relative abundance of families known to be important in fibre digestion (Fibrobacteriaceae and Akkermansiaceae). Analysis of piglet microbiota at two weeks and four weeks of age revealed a relative decrease in Enterobacteriaceae while butyrate producers (Lachnospiraceae family) were increased at both timepoints.

Conclusion

We hypothesise that the effects observed from this study were exerted through modulation of the gut microbial communities in the sow and her offspring through maternal microbial transfer. Understanding the link between the gut microbiota and dietary factors represents a keystone to improving health and performance for sustainable pig production. Reducing antimicrobial usage can help to reduce the risk of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) which is a global focus for animal production.

https://animalmicrobiome.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s42523-020-00064-2

Effects of oregano essential oil on the ruminal pH and microbial population of sheep

Abstract

Oregano essential oil (OEO), which has antimicrobial properties, may be used for altering the ruminal pH and microbial populations of sheep, as observed by the altered volatile fatty acid patterns. To further elucidate the effects of OEO on ruminal pH and microbial populations of sheep, 3 German merino sheep × local sheep crossbred rams with permanent ruminal fistulas were randomly assigned to a 3 × 3 Latin square design with 12-d periods. The treatments were as follows: control (CON); OEO4: OEO supplied at 4 g•d-1; and OEO7: OEO supplied at 7 g•d-1. Starting on day 11, rumen fluid was collected at 0 h, and at 4, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h after supplying OEO, and then pH values of rumen fluid were immediately measured. The abundance of microbial populations was determined by using qPCR. The ruminal pH values were similar among the sheep from all treatments. The abundance of ruminal fungi was higher for the sheep supplied OEO7 compared with the sheep supplied CON and OEO4, especially at 4 and 12 h. The abundance of ruminal protozoa decreased with supplied OEO, indicating that OEO could inhibit the protozoa. The abundance of the total ruminal bacteria was similar for the sheep from all treatments, but RflavefaciensRalbus and Fsuccinogenes increased in the sheep supplied OEO4 compared with those in the sheep supplied CON, however, the sheep supplied OEO7 had higher abundances of Rflavefaciens than the sheep supplied CON. These results demonstrated that supplying OEO to sheep did not affect the ruminal pH but could shift the rumen microbial population to one with less protozoa. Supplying OEO can preferentially enhance the growth of certain rumen microbial populations, but the shifts were influenced by the supply rate. Therefore, supplying low amount (i.e. 4 g•d-1) of OEO could have positive effects on ruminal microbial populations, whereas supplying elevated doses of OEO could be detrimental to those same ruminal microbial populations.

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0217054

Effect of anticoccidial monensin with oregano essential oil on broilers experimentally challenged with mixed Eimeria spp

Essential oil of oregano ( OEO: ) has proven to be a potential candidate for controlling chicken coccidiosis. The aim of the current study is to determine whether OEO and an approved anticoccidial, monensin sodium ( MON: ), as in-feed supplements could create a synergism when combined at low dosages. Day-old broiler chickens were separated into six equal groups with six replicate pens of 36 birds. One of the groups was given a basal diet and served as the control ( CNT: ). The remaining groups received the basal diet supplemented with 100 mg/kg MON, 50 mg/kg MON, 24 mg/kg OEO, 12 mg/kg OEO, or 50 mg/kg MON + 12 mg/kg OEO. All of the chickens were challenged with field-type mixed Eimeria species at 12 d of age. Following the infection (i.e., d 13 to 42), the greatest growth gains and lowest feed conversion ratio values were recorded for the group of birds fed 100 mg/kg MON (P < 0.05), whereas results for the CNT treatment were inferior. Dietary OEO supplementations could not support growth to a level comparable with the MON (100 mg/kg). The MON programs were more efficacious in reducing fecal oocyst numbers compared to CNT and OEO treatments (P < 0.05). Serum malondialdehyde and nitric oxide concentrations were decreased (P < 0.01), whereas superoxide dismutase (P < 0.05) and total antioxidant status (P < 0.01) were increased in response to dietary medication with MON and OEO. All MON and OEO treatments conferred intestinal health benefits to chickens by improving their morphological development and enzymatic activities. The results suggest that OEO supported the intestinal absorptive capacity and antioxidant defense system during Eimeria infection; however, it displayed little direct activity on the reproductive capacity of Eimeria This might be the reason for inferior compensatory growth potential of OEO compared to that MON following the challenge. Combination MON with OEO was not considered to show promise for controlling chicken coccidiosis because of the lack of a synergistic or additive effect.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26976910

In vitro Anticoccidial Study of Oregano and Garlic Essential Oils and Effects on Growth Performance, Fecal Oocyst Output, and Intestinal Microbiota in vivo

In conclusion, the combined supplementation of oregano and garlic essential oils had a potent anticoccidial effect in vitro and a growth-promoting effect in broilers reared in the absence of anticoccidial drugs.

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fvets.2020.00420/full

Anthelmintic Properties of Essential Oils to Control Gastrointestinal Nematodes in Sheep—In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

Abstract

Herbal products such as essential oils may play a promising role in the treatment of infections caused by gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs). The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro potential of 11 essential oils (EOs) and one binary combination of isolated EO compounds, as well as the in vivo anthelmintic efficacy of two EO formulations. Four GIN genera were identified in the coproculture examination: HaemonchusTrichostrongylusTeladorsagia and Chabertia. The in vitro egg hatch test (EHT) was performed at six different concentrations (50, 12.5, 3.125, 0.781, 0.195 and 0.049 mg/mL) for each EO, whereas in the in vivo faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT), each EO sample was diluted in sunflower oil and orally administrated at a dose of 100 mg/kg to the different group of animals. In the EHT, the EOs of Origanum vulgareFoeniculum vulgareSatureja montanaSatureja hortensis and two types of Thymus vulgaris were the most effective. The dominant compounds of these EOs were carvacrol, thymol, anethol, p-cymene and γ-terpinene, indicating their importance for the anthelmintic activity. In the FECRT, both T. vulgaris EO type 1 and linalool:estragole combination show an anthelmintic potential with a mean effect on FECR of approximately 25%. The results suggest the possible role of tested EOs as anthelmintic agents in sheep farms, although further in vivo tests are needed.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8880401

Oregano essential oil may target harmful bacteria while supporting healthy bacteria in the gut.

“Oregano may target potentially pathogenic species without affecting the microbiome at large, which helps promote a healthy microbial diversity in the gut.* In an in vitro study, researchers tested oil of oregano on standardized cultures of the bacteria Staphylococcus aureusEscherichia coli, and Streptococcus pyogenes. Oil of oregano was extremely effective with all three strains. The same study then assessed the effect of oil of oregano supplements for minor infections in patients with metabolic syndrome. There was a lower number of infections at the end of the follow-up period compared to the baseline. The patients also experienced a reduction of gastrointestinal symptoms post-treatment. The researchers postulated this was due to oregano not affecting the commensal species in the gut microbiota.”

https://www.casi.org/node/1517

The Antimicrobial Activity of Origanum vulgare L. Correlated with the Gastrointestinal Perturbation in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

Abstract

(1) The metabolic syndrome (MS) promotes acute and chronic infections, due to the pro-inflammatory condition given by TNFα and IL6 or by affecting the microbiota. MS is also correlated with insulin resistance, causing inflammation and infections throughout the organism. (2) The purpose of this study was to track the effect of using the essential oil of Origanum vulgare L. (EOO) as an antibacterial treatment, compared to allopathic treatment with antibiotics in MS patients. A group of 106 people with MS was divided into four subgroups: L1—staphylococcal infection group, L2—Escherichia coli infection group, L3—streptococcal infection group with EOO treatment, and CG—control group without infection or treatment. (3) EOO is responsible for the antibacterial effect, and reduced minor uncomplicated infections. After a 10-day treatment, intestinal side effects were absent, improving the phase angle. (4) The results suggest that EOO may exhibit an antibacterial effect, similar to the antibiotic treatment, without promoting MS-specific dysbiosis, and it also improves the phase angle in patients, which is used as an index of health and cellular function.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7827761

Oregano Essential Oils Mediated Intestinal Microbiota and Metabolites and Improved Growth Performance and Intestinal Barrier Function in Sheep

Abstract

With the increased demand for safe and sustainable alternatives to growth promoting antibiotics in the livestock industry, oregano essential oils (OEO) and Lactobacillus reuteri (LR) have been examined as alternatives to antibiotics for growth promotion and to improve animal health and performance. However, the mechanism underlying the OEO and LR mediation of sheep growth remains unknown. In this study, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and untargeted metabolomics were used to determine the role of the gut microbiota in the growth improvements observed. The potential modulating roles of intestinal microbial metabolites of OEO and LR to intestinal health were systematically explored as well. It was observed that both OEO and LR had greater average daily gain (ADG) and lower F/G ratio. Furthermore, OEO also appeared to have produced a greater amylase enzyme activity and mucin gene expression in the jejunal mucosa. It was also observed that OEO reduced serum IL-2 and TNF-β as well as mRNA levels of NF-κB p65, toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4), and IL-6 in the jejunal mucosa. Moreover, dietary OEO supplementation increased the abundances of RuminococcusBifidobacterium and Enterococcus, while the relative abundances of SucciniclasticumMarvinbryantia and Streptococcus were enriched in LR group. Spearman’s correlation analysis revealed that the abundances of BifidobacteriumRuminococcus and Enterococcus were positively correlated with the mRNA expression of mucins. Moreover, the relative abundance of Enterococcus was positively correlated with amylase activity. Metabolomics analysis indicated that OEO and LR increased the levels of indole acetaldehyde and indole-3-acetic acid through the tryptophan metabolism pathway. It was observed that LR also decreased the inflammatory metabolites including tryptamine and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid. Collectively, these results suggested that OEO exerted a beneficial effect on growth performance and the mucosal barrier, affected tryptophan metabolism and improved the intestinal microbiota of sheep.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9314563

Oregano Essential Oil Improves Intestinal Morphology and Expression of Tight Junction Proteins Associated with Modulation of Selected Intestinal Bacteria and Immune Status in a Pig Model

Abstract

Oregano essential oil (OEO) has long been used to improve the health of animals, particularly the health of intestine, which is generally attributed to its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects. However, how OEO acts in the intestine of pig is still unclear. This study was aimed at elucidating how OEO promotes the intestinal barrier integrity in a pig model. Pigs were fed a control diet alone or one supplemented with 25 mg/kg of OEO for 4 weeks. The OEO-treated pigs showed decreased (P < 0.05) endotoxin level in serum and increased (P < 0.05) villus height and expression of occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) in the jejunum. These results demonstrated that the integrity of intestinal barrier was improved by OEO treatment. The OEO-treated pigs had a lower (P < 0.05) population of Escherichia coli in the jejunum, ileum, and colon than the control. This is in accordance with the greater inactivation (P < 0.05) of inflammation, which was reflected by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), protein kinase B (Akt), and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways and expression of inflammatory cytokines in the jejunum. Our results show that OEO promotes intestinal barrier integrity, probably through modulating intestinal bacteria and immune status in pigs.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4903144

Dietary oregano essential oil supplementation improves intestinal functions and alters gut microbiota in late-phase laying hens

Abstract

Background

Dietary essential oil (EO) supplementation can exert favorable effects on gut health in broilers. However, it is unknown whether EO could improve intestinal functions, consequently beneficial for egg performance and quality in late-phase laying hens. This study was aimed to investigate the potential effects of EO on production performance, egg quality, intestinal health and ileal microbiota of hens in the late phase of production. A total of 288 60-week-old Hy-line Brown laying hens were randomly divided into 4 groups and fed a basal diet (control) or basal diets supplemented with oregano EO at 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg (EO100, EO200 and EO400).

Results

Dietary EO supplementation resulted in a quadratic decrease (P < 0.05) in feed conversion ratio with lower (P < 0.05) feed conversion ratio in EO200 group than the control during weeks 9–12 and 1–12 of the trial. Compared to the control, EO addition resulted in higher (P < 0.05) eggshell thickness at the end of week. 4, 8 and 12 and higher (P < 0.05) chymotrypsin activity. There was a quadratic elevation (P < 0.05) in ileal chymotrypsin and lipase activity, along with a linear increase in villus height to crypt depth ratio. Quadratic declines (P < 0.05) in mRNA expression of IL-1βTNF-αIFN-γ and TLR-4, concurrent with a linear and quadratic increase (P < 0.05) in ZO-1 expression were identified in the ileum with EO addition. These favorable effects were maximized at medium dosage (200 mg/kg) of EO addition and intestinal microbial composition in the control and EO200 groups were assessed. Dietary EO addition increased (P < 0.05) the abundances of Burkholderiales, Actinobacteria, Bifidobacteriales, Enterococcaceae and Bacillaceae, whereas decreased Shigella abundance in the ileum.

Conclusions

Dietary EO addition could enhance digestive enzyme activity, improve gut morphology, epithelial barrier functions and modulate mucosal immune status by altering microbial composition, thus favoring feed efficiency and eggshell quality of late-phase laying hens.

https://jasbsci.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40104-021-00600-3

Harnessing the Benefits of Oregano Oil for Gut Symptoms and Overall Wellness

Key Takeaways

  • Oil of oregano contains active ingredients with antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties.
  • The natural antibiotic qualities of oregano may help to clear out stubborn yeast infections and bacterial infections.
  • The pathogen you’re dealing with doesn’t really matter — oil of oregano is useful to correct an overall imbalance in your gut environment.
  • Antimicrobials like oil of oregano are useful as extra help to balance digestive health but are not your first line of gut defense.
  • Before introducing oregano, try making improvements to your diet and introducing probiotics.
  • Make sure the oil of oregano you choose is suitable for internal consumption.

Influence of increasing levels of oregano essential oil on intestinal morphology, intestinal flora and performance of Sewa sheep

Abstract

The purpose of this experiment was to study the effects of oregano essential oil (OEO) on the performance, intestinal morphology and intestinal flora of fattening Sewa sheep. Sixty 20-month-old Sewa sheep with similar body weights (BWs) and in good health were randomly divided into four groups. The groups were fed a diet containing 0 mg/kg OEO (group A), 150 mg/kg (group B), 300 mg/kg (group C) or 450 mg/kg (group D). Daily gain, slaughter rate and other production performance parameters were analysed in the test sheep (mean ± standard error). Intestinal morphology was analysed by tissue sectioning, and intestinal flora was analysed by 16S rRNA genome sequencing. The indexes, including average daily gain (ADG), slaughter rate, villus length of the small intestine and number of beneficial bacteria in the intestinal flora, in group C were significantly higher than those in the other groups. Supplementation with 300 mg/kg OEO concentrate in the diets can improve the growth performance of Sewa sheep by changing their intestinal morphology and modifying their intestinal flora structure. Conclusively, these encourage to further verifying in practice positive evidence in improving growth performance of OEO supplementation in the diets for Sewa sheep.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1828051X.2022.2048208

Effects of dietary oregano essential oil supplementation on growth performance, intestinal antioxidative capacity, immunity, and intestinal microbiota in yellow-feathered chickens

Abstract

Essential oils are plant-derived aromatic volatile oils, and they contain bioactive compounds that have been shown to
improve poultry nutrition. In this study, we investigated the effects of oregano essential oil (OEO) on intestinal antioxidative
capacity, immunity, and gut microbiota of young yellow-feathered chickens. A total of nine hundred and sixty 1-d-old
female Qingyuan partridge chickens were randomly allocated to four treatment groups with six replicates of 40 birds each,
and the feeding trial was lasted for 30 d. The controls were fed on a basal diet without in-feed antibiotics; the birds in the
antibiotic group were fed the basal diet supplemented with 20 mg/kg virginiamycin; the remaining birds were fed the basal
diet containing 150 or 300 mg/kg OEO, respectively. Dietary supplementation with 150 or 300 mg/kg OEO increased average
daily feed intake (P = 0.057) and average daily gain (P < 0.05). The activities of glutathione peroxidase and total antioxidative
capacity in plasma, jejuna, and ileal mucosa were increased by OEO supplementation (P < 0.05), with a trend of lower jejunal
content of malonaldehyde (P = 0.062). Moreover, dietary OEO increased the content of secretory immunoglobulin A (P = 0.078)
and the relative expression of Claudin 1, Mucin 2, and Avain beta-defensin 1 in ileum (P < 0.05). Sequencing data of 16S
rRNA indicated that dietary OEO increased the relative abundance of Firmicutes phylum, and Clostridium and Lactobacillus
genera, and decreasing that of Romboutsia. Functional analyses indicated that microbial amino sugar and nucleotide sugar
metabolism, replication, and repair systems were higher in OEO groups than those of controls and antibiotic treatment. In
conclusion, dietary supplementation with OEO enhanced growth performance, alleviated local oxidative stress in intestine,
improved production of natural antibodies, and favorably modulated intestinal microbiota composition.

https://scholar.cu.edu.eg/sites/default/files/ah_fouad/files/effects_of_dietary_oregano_essential_oil.pdf

Bactericidal Property of Oregano Oil Against Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolates

Abstract

Development of non-antibiotic alternatives to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) microbes represents one of the top priorities in healthcare and community settings, especially in the care of combat trauma-associated wound infections. Here, we investigate efficacy of oregano oil against pathogenic bacteria including MDR isolates from the combat casualties in vitro and in a mouse burn model. Oregano oil showed a significant anti-bacterial activity against 11 MDR clinical isolates including four Acinetobacter baumannii, three Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and four methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) obtained from combat casualties and two luminescent strains of PA01 and MRSA USA300, with a MIC ranging from 0.08 mg/ml to 0.64 mg/ml. Oregano oil also effectively eradicated biofilms formed by each of the 13 pathogens above at similar MICs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that oregano oil damaged bacterial cells and altered the morphology of their biofilms. While efficiently inactivating bacteria, there was no evidence of resistance development after up to 20 consecutive passages of representative bacterial strains in the presence of sublethal doses of oregano oil. In vivo study using the third-degree burn wounds infected with PA01 or USA300 demonstrated that oregano oil, topically applied 24 h after bacterial inoculation, sufficiently reduced the bacterial load in the wounds by 3 log10 in 1 h, as measured by drastic reduction of bacterial bioluminescence. This bactericidal activity of oregano oil concurred with no significant side effect on the skin histologically or genotoxicity after three topical applications of oregano oil at 10 mg/ml for three consecutive days. The investigation suggests potentials of oregano oil as an alternative to antibiotics for the treatment of wound-associated infections regardless of antibiotic susceptibility.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6182053

Antibacterial mechanism of oregano essential oil

Abstract

Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is highly pathogenic and multi-drug resistant, so MRSA infection has become one of the important pathogens of nosocomial infections. Oregano essential oil is an effective natural antibacterial agent and has been found to be effective in inhibiting MRSA. In this experiment, the effects of oregano essential oil on respiratory metabolism, energy metabolism and genetic material of MRSA were studied with the metabolism as the starting point. At the same time, the effects of oregano essential oil on the relative expression of pvl in MRSA were further studied from the genetic level. The results indicate that oregano essential oil can cause irreversible damage to the MRSA cell membrane and cause leakage of biological macromolecules in the cell. Oregano essential oil inhibits the tricarboxylic acid cycle pathway and its key enzymes and affects the metabolites. In addition, the main component of oregano essential oil, carvacrol, can be chimeric with DNA, and oregano essential oil inhibits the relative expression of the pvl gene.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0926669019305102

Oregano Essential Oil and Gut Health

Oregano essential oil (OEO) is increasingly studied for its potential benefits on gut health, particularly in relation to gut flora and overall digestive function in various animal models.

  • Dietary OEO has been shown to improve growth performance, enhance intestinal morphometry, and positively influence hepato-renal functions in common carp fingerlings1.
  • OEO supplementation in diets can improve immune response, digestive enzyme activity, and modulate intestinal microbiota in koi carp, leading to increased levels of beneficial bacteria such as Lactobacillus2.
  • In yellow-feathered chickens, OEO has been found to increase antioxidative capacity, immunity, and favorably alter gut microbiota, increasing the abundance of beneficial genera like Clostridium and Lactobacillus3.
  • OEO can improve egg-production performance and alter microbial composition in laying hens, with increased abundance of beneficial bacteria like Actinobacteriota4.
  • Supplementation with OEO in beef cattle has been associated with improved rumen digestive ability, modulated epithelial development, and microbiota composition, increasing beneficial bacteria like Parabacteroides distasonis5.
  • OEO can enhance growth performance in Sewa sheep by modifying intestinal morphology and increasing beneficial bacteria in the gut flora6.
  • OEO induces expression of antioxidant enzymes through Nrf2 activation, which may alleviate oxidative damage and support intestinal health in IPEC-J2 cells7.
  • A combination of oregano and garlic essential oils has shown potent anticoccidial effects in vitro and promoted growth in broilers by modulating intestinal microbiota8.
  • OEO has protective effects against oxidative stress-induced dysfunction of the intestinal epithelial barrier in rats, potentially through modification of intestinal microbiota and enhancement of antioxidative capacity9.

In conclusion, the research indicates that oregano essential oil has a beneficial impact on gut flora and overall digestive health across various animal species. It appears to enhance growth performance, immune response, and antioxidative capacity, while also favorably modulating the gut microbiota by increasing the abundance of beneficial bacteria. These findings suggest that OEO could be a valuable natural supplement for improving gut health and function.

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