Reply To: Cedar/Juniper/Firs

  • Haley

    Member
    December 5, 2023 at 9:04 pm

    Reported Native American uses: “Western red cedar was employed medicinally by a number of native North American Indian tribes, who used it to treat a wide range of complaints. It is seldom, if ever, used in modern herbalism. An infusion of the leaves has been used in the treatment of stomach pains and diarrhoea. A decoction of the leaves has been used in the treatment of colds. A decoction of the powdered leaves has been used externally to treat various internal pains, including rheumatism. The leaf buds have been chewed in the treatment of toothaches and sore lungs. A decoction of the buds has been used as a gargle. A decoction of the small branches has been used in the treatment of coughs, colds and tuberculosis. A weak infusion has been drunk in the treatment of painful joints caused by rheumatism or arthritis. A poultice of the crushed bough tips and oil has been applied to the back and chest in the treatment of bronchitis, rheumatism, stomach pains and swollen neck. An infusion of the twigs has been used as a wash in the treatment of venereal disease sores. A decoction of the boughs has been used as an antidandruff shampoo. A decoction of the stem tips and the roots has been used in the treatment of colds. An infusion of the bark and twigs has been used in the treatment of kidney complaints. An infusion of the seeds and twigs has been used in the treatment of fevers. The chewed bark, or a decoction of the bark, has been drunk to induce menstruation. A moxa of the inner bark has been used as a counter-irritant for the skin. A poultice of the inner bark has been applied to carbuncles. The bark has been pounded until it is as soft as cotton and then used to rub the face. The very soft bark has been used to bind wounds and cover dressings. The shredded bark has been used to cauterize sores and swellings.”